MTNA E Journal April 2017 : Cover 2

7 www.mtnaejournal.org MTNA Leadership From the Editorial Committee his is the last time I’ll write as chair of the MTNA e-Journal Editorial Commit-tee. At the great MTNA get-together in Baltimore, this leadership role passed to the capable hands of Linda Cockey, profes-sor of music at Salisbury University in Maryland. I am unendingly grateful to all of the profes-sional colleagues who have served on the committee, giving of their time and expertise to evaluate critically each manuscript that has been submitted for review. The professional-ism and work ethic of the MTNA publications staff has been utterly indispensable. The e-Journal has been a presence in my professional life and thinking for a long time. I was privileged to be part of the conversations that led to its creation. From its inception, the e-Journal has been MTNA’s response to the perceived and verified need for musi-cians and teachers who pursue research—and who write about that research—to a degree of depth not easy to include in a professional magazine that serves the breadth and diversity of the full MTNA membership. Teaching musicians in the Academy felt the need for a Andrew Hisey, NCTM peer-reviewed journal that could be taken seriously by academic administrations as reliable recogni-tion in the field of original research and contri-butions to the scholarship of music teaching. The timing was right for a publication enabled to take advantage of advances in communica-tion and presentation technologies, too. Many of the e-Journal articles published since 2009 have been enhanced, supported and made more impactful by the inclusion of video, audio, graphic and hyperlinked information. The MTNA e-Journal came into existence in response to a relatively new development in the music field: that of advanced degrees and graduate courses in music pedagogy. It’s T an area of study that is still striving to define itself, to establish and apply meaningful met-rics of assessment and depth of research, and to build upon the work of other scholars in coherent ways. The schools and departments that house these programs exist cheek by jowl with scientific, humanistic and literary academic units. Educational institutions search for transparent, fair ways to assess faculty that rely on common values and prin-ciples, translatable ways of comparing per-formers, teachers, scientists, philosophers and theorists across fields. Looking beyond the field of music and the arts, we have witnessed in this age of com-puters and the Internet a significant shift in the way research is carried out, disseminated, accessed, cited and used. Most academic journals have migrated to a web-based “face” that is, in most cases, searchable, archived and indexed, and paid for by institutions and individuals who are interested in the latest contributions to the field, whether they break new ground, confirm existing knowledge in new ways, or challenge long-held positions and assumptions. Ours is a field of long tradition, one that val-ues the transmission of that tradition through mentorship, one that is perhaps less easy to quantify than pure, applied or social sciences. Or perhaps our community is less interested in numeric distillation and statistics, a little loathe to try to box up something that has a decidedly personal, spiritual, expressive, intan-gible character. It is hard to imagine a way forward in the world of music making and music teaching that does not involve mindful, directed, intentional exploration and research. I hope to be curling up with my Mac for years to come, finding inspiration, questions, provocation and corrobo-ration in the e-pages of the MTNA e-Journal . Thank you for the privilege of serving you. — Andrew Hisey, NCTM, Editorial Committee Chair, 2013–2017

From The Editorial Committee

This is the last time I’ll write as chair of the MTNA e-Journal Editorial Committee. At the great MTNA get-together in Baltimore, this leadership role passed to the capable hands of Linda Cockey, professor of music at Salisbury University in Maryland. I am unendingly grateful to all of the professional colleagues who have served on the committee, giving of their time and expertise to evaluate critically each manuscript that has been submitted for review. The professionalism and work ethic of the MTNA publications staff has been utterly indispensable.



Andrew Hisey, NCTM

The e-Journal has been a presence in my professional life and thinking for a long time. I was privileged to be part of the conversations that led to its creation. From its inception, the e-Journal has been MTNA’s response to the perceived and verified need for musicians and teachers who pursue research—and who write about that research—to a degree of depth not easy to include in a professional magazine that serves the breadth and diversity of the full MTNA membership. Teaching musicians in the Academy felt the need for a peer-reviewed journal that could be taken seriously by academic administrations as reliable recognition in the field of original research and contributions to the scholarship of music teaching. The timing was right for a publication enabled to take advantage of advances in communication and presentation technologies, too. Many of the e-Journal articles published since 2009 have been enhanced, supported and made more impactful by the inclusion of video, audio, graphic and hyperlinked information.

The MTNA e-Journal came into existence in response to a relatively new development in the music field: that of advanced degrees and graduate courses in music pedagogy. It’s an area of study that is still striving to define itself, to establish and apply meaningful metrics of assessment and depth of research, and to build upon the work of other scholars in coherent ways. The schools and departments that house these programs exist cheek by jowl with scientific, humanistic and literary academic units. Educational institutions search for transparent, fair ways to assess faculty that rely on common values and principles, translatable ways of comparing performers, teachers, scientists, philosophers and theorists across fields.

Looking beyond the field of music and the arts, we have witnessed in this age of computers and the Internet a significant shift in the way research is carried out, disseminated, accessed, cited and used. Most academic journals have migrated to a web-based “face” that is, in most cases, searchable, archived and indexed, and paid for by institutions and individuals who are interested in the latest contributions to the field, whether they break new ground, confirm existing knowledge in new ways, or challenge long-held positions and assumptions.

Ours is a field of long tradition, one that values the transmission of that tradition through mentorship, one that is perhaps less easy to quantify than pure, applied or social sciences. Or perhaps our community is less interested in numeric distillation and statistics, a little loathe to try to box up something that has a decidedly personal, spiritual, expressive, intangible character.

It is hard to imagine a way forward in the world of music making and music teaching that does not involve mindful, directed, intentional exploration and research. I hope to be curling up with my Mac for years to come, finding inspiration, questions, provocation and corroboration in the e-pages of the MTNA e-Journal.

Thank you for the privilege of serving you.

—Andrew Hisey, NCTM, Editorial Committee Chair, 2013–2017

Read the full article at http://www.mtnaejournal.org/article/From+The+Editorial+Committee/2759664/398860/article.html.

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