MTNA E Journal February 2017 : IFC

7 www.mtnaejournal.org MTNA Leadership From the Editorial Committee here are cornerstones of our teaching craft that remain constant regardless of societal change. These include designing well-sequenced curricula that provide opportunities for students to develop and hone musical skills, planning and pre-paring for weekly lessons, using high-quality teaching materials and repertoire, and motiv-ating our pupils to work and achieve their best. Effective teachers bolster and improve techniques related to these teaching pillars throughout their careers. Indeed, keep-ing abreast of new materials and research that informs our teaching with respect to these foundational ideals is an important part of our ongoing professional development. Articles writ-Pamela D. Pike, NCTM ten by pedagogues and researchers, such as those published in the MTNA e-Journal, can help us to refine these core aspects of our teaching. Sometimes, however, e-Journal articles challenge us to consider new ways of reach-ing students. Incorporating change and exploring new dimensions of teaching can be beneficial. But, change can be unsettling and difficult. Although we have access to more information than ever, in a globalized world where it feels like change is happening at an unprecedented pace, there is rarely enough time to decipher and process information. Exploring New Dimensions Of Teaching T During such times, retreating to our familiar lesson plans and materials can be comforting. Yet, technology is a peripheral teaching com-ponent that many teachers have embraced. For example, many of us have incorporated technology into our studios to improve both teaching and business efficiency through stu-dio websites, use of audio and video technol-ogy, and online music resources. The first e-Journal of 2017 offers us a chance to ponder how technology itself can be used as the platform, or vehicle, for teaching students who may not live in close proximity to us. In her auto-ethnographic case study, Diana Dumlavwalla reports on a semester-long experiment with teaching five piano students in an online environment. She found that there were benefits, drawbacks, and opportunities for the students and the teacher. Even if you have no intention of teaching music online, the article explores aspects of our teaching that we may take for granted and reminds us that self-reflection and honest communication with parents and students is a critical component of success-ful music lessons, regardless of the teaching situation. Hopefully, as you read this article you will consider engaging in a similar reflect-ive practice with your students to increase teaching effectiveness, parent satisfaction and students’ musical experiences—some of you may even explore teaching music online! —Pamela D. Pike, NCTM Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, Louisiana

From The Editorial Committee

Exploring New Dimensions Of Teaching


Pamela D. Pike, NCTM

There are cornerstones of our teaching craft that remain constant regardless of societal change. These include designing well-sequenced curricula that provide opportunities for students to develop and hone musical skills, planning and preparing for weekly lessons, using high-quality teaching materials and repertoire, and motivating our pupils to work and achieve their best. Effective teachers bolster and improve techniques related to these teaching pillars throughout their careers. Indeed, keeping abreast of new materials and research that informs our teaching with respect to these foundational ideals is an important part of our ongoing professional development. Articles written by pedagogues and researchers, such as those published in the MTNA e-Journal, can help us to refine these core aspects of our teaching.

Sometimes, however, e-Journal articles challenge us to consider new ways of reaching students. Incorporating change and exploring new dimensions of teaching can be beneficial. But, change can be unsettling and difficult. Although we have access to more information than ever, in a globalized world where it feels like change is happening at an unprecedented pace, there is rarely enough time to decipher and process information. During such times, retreating to our familiar lesson plans and materials can be comforting. Yet, technology is a peripheral teaching component that many teachers have embraced. For example, many of us have incorporated technology into our studios to improve both teaching and business efficiency through studio websites, use of audio and video technology, and online music resources.

The first e-Journal of 2017 offers us a chance to ponder how technology itself can be used as the platform, or vehicle, for teaching students who may not live in close proximity to us. In her auto-ethnographic case study, Diana Dumlavwalla reports on a semester-long experiment with teaching five piano students in an online environment. She found that there were benefits, drawbacks, and opportunities for the students and the teacher. Even if you have no intention of teaching music online, the article explores aspects of our teaching that we may take for granted and reminds us that self-reflection and honest communication with parents and students is a critical component of successful music lessons, regardless of the teaching situation. Hopefully, as you read this article you will consider engaging in a similar reflective practice with your students to increase teaching effectiveness, parent satisfaction and students’ musical experiences—some of you may even explore teaching music online!

—Pamela D. Pike, NCTM Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Read the full article at http://www.mtnaejournal.org/article/From+The+Editorial+Committee/2711247/383753/article.html.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here